Shannon Statue Dedications

With initial sponsorship of the IEEE Information Theory Society, six statues of Claude Shannon by Eugene Daub have been dedicated at various sites throughout the United States.


Shannon Statue Dedicated at the University of Michigan

Friday, November 9, 2001



At noon on a beautiful day in early November, approximately two hundred members of the University of Michigan Community attended the dedication of a Eugene Daub statue of Claude Elwood Shannon at the west entrance to the EECS Building on the North Campus of the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Claude E. Shannon was a University of Michigan graduate -- BSE EE '36, BSE Math '36. His legendary 1948 paper, "The Mathematical Theory of Communication" unveiled the vast potential for digital communications and inspired virtually all of the work in digital communications that followed. He is also famous for his work on cryptography, the sampling theorem, and the discovery of the relevance of Boolean algebra to logic circuit design. He is considered to be one of the people most responsible for ushering in the digital age.

To learn more about Shannon and his work, consider these websites.

Professor and Interim EECS Dept. Chairman Richard Brown presided at the dedication and brief remarks were made by UM College of Engeering Dean Stephen W. Director, EECS Professor David L. Neuhoff, and William G. Gould Distinguished Lecturer Dr. Robert W. Lucky, Corporate Vice President of Telcordia Technologies.

The plaque inscription:

Claude Elwood Shannon

Father of Information Theory

B.S.E. Electrical Engineering '36
B.S.E. Mathematics '36

His creation of the mathematical theory
of communication in the mid-twentieth century
inspired the revolutionary advances in digital
communications and information storage
that have shaped the modern world

Dedicated November 9, 2001
Eugene Daub, Sculptor



 
 
 
 

The west entrance to the EECS Building.

Professor Richard Brown presides.


 
 

Professor David Neuhoff and Dean Stephen Director unveil.
 
 


Graduate student Kevin Holt displays Shannon's capacity formula for the white Gaussian noise channel, as inscripbed on the 'sheet'  in the statue's left hand.
(C is the number of bits per second that can be reliably transmitted with bandwidth W and power P when combatting noise power N.)


Dr. Robert Lucky.


 
 

Professor Neuhoff, Dean Director and Dr. Robert Lucky.


 

Refreshments.


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


IEEE LogoShannon Statue DedicationIT Society Logo
 Gaylord, Michigan
Friday, October 6, 2000
 
 

Statue of Claude Shannon Dedicated in Gaylord, Michigan

On October 6, before an enthusiastic crowd of IT Society members and local residents, a bronze statue of Claude Shannon was dedicated by IT President Vijay Bhargava in Gaylord, Michigan -- Shannon's home town. Unveiled by Mrs. Betty Shannon and sculptor Eugene Daub, the statue is located in Shannon Park in the center of downtown Gaylord. Shannon Park is the former site of the Shannon Building, built and owned by Claude Shannon's father. The statue, commissioned by the IEEE Information Theory Society, includes the AWGN capacity formula on a sheet of "paper" in Claude's left hand.

Immediately, following the unveiling, the engineers, spouses and local residents moved to the nearby Otsego Club to escape the prematurely wintery weather and to attend a reception and panel discussion. The panel of distinguished information theorists, Tony Ephremides (moderator), Dick Blahut, Bob Gray, Bob McEliece, Gottfried Ungerboeck and Jack Wolf, made brief and personal remarks about the impact of Shannon's work on themselves and on society at large. A copy of Shannon's collected works, signed by the information theorists attending, was given to the Gaylord Historical Society.

For additional photographs of the unveiling, dedication and panel discussion, see Jody O'Sullivan's web site.

Coverage of the dedication in the Gaylord Herald Times, Oct. 7.

Click here to learn about Claude Shannon and his work.

statue

Mrs. Shannon with the statue. (photograph courtesy of J. O'Sullivan)
The inscription is reproduced below.
 
 
 
 
 

Claude Elwood Shannon 

Father of Information Theory

Electrical engineer, mathematician, and native
son of Gaylord. His creation of information theory,
the mathematical theory of communication,
in the 1940s and 1950s inspired the revolutionary
advances in digital communications and
information storage that
have shaped the modern world.

This statue was donated by the
Information Theory Society of the Institute of
Electrical and Electronics Engineers,
whose members follow gratefully in his footsteps.

Dedicated October 6, 2000
Eugene Daub, Sculptor

























The following is the web page, essentially as it appeared prior to Oct. 6 

The Shannon Statue

A bronze statue of Claude Shannon will be unveiled on Friday, October 6, 2000 in his hometown, Gaylord, Michigan. This sculpture by Eugene Daub was commissioned by the Information Theory Society of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). It will be installed in the recently named Shannon Park in downtown Gaylord. Click here for a sneak preview. Click here to learn about Claude Shannon and his work.

Invitation

Everyone is warmly invited to attend the program, which includes the unveiling ceremony from 6 to 6:30 PM in Shannon Park, followed immediately by a reception and a panel discussion at the Otsego Club, located approximately one mile east of Shannon Park, in the Hidden Valley Resort. The reception will include drinks and plentiful hor d'oevres. From 7:30 to 8:30 PM, a panel of distinguished Information Theorists will discuss the impact of Shannon's work on everyday life.

If you think you might attend the reception, the organizers would appreciate receiving an indication of your interest, via email, to assist their planning. You will also be included in an email mailing list that will announce updates to the program or to this website.

Allerton Conference

It is anticipated that some participants will attend the University of Illinois' Allerton Conference on Communications, Control and Computing, just prior to the Gaylord festivities. A chartered flight from Champaign to Gaylord has been booked. Click here for details. If you are interested in sharing a car or van from Champaign to Gaylord, please inform the organizers (of the unveiling ceremony), via email. They will attempt to match people with similar travel plans and to help them make suitable arrangements.

Gaylord

Gaylord is at the center of a golf, ski and summer resort area in the northern part of the lower peninsula of Michigan, about 220 miles north of Detroit and Ann Arbor. It is also noted for its fall color season, which usually peaks in early October. Click here for a map showing the location of Gaylord within Michigan, here for a map of Gaylord itself, and here for pictures of downtown Gaylord and Shannon Park, the statue site.

Gaylord is especially known for its golf courses, and early October is a nice time to play. If there is interest, a golf outing will be arranged for Saturday, Oct. 7. If you are interested, please inform the organizers, via email.

Travel

Cherry Capital Airport, Traverse City, MI, is the closest commercial airport to Gaylord. From there, one may rent a car and drive to Gaylord (69 miles, 1 1/4 hours). There are flights to Traverse City from Chicago, Detroit, Milwaukee, Minneapolis and a few other cities. Click here for a complete flight schedule.

MBS International Airport, Saginaw, MI, is the next closest commerical airport. It is about a two hour drive (on 70 mph freeway) from Gaylord.

Bishop International Airport, Flint, MI, is about a 2 1/2 hour drive (on 70 mph freeway) from Gaylord.

Detroit Metro Airport is the closest major commercial airport (220 miles, all on 70 mph freeway, 3 1/2 hours).

There is also a noncommerical airport in Gaylord, suitable for chartered flights. A chartered flight from Champaign to Gaylord has been booked. Click here for details. If you are interested in chartered flights from other locations, please inform the organizers, via email. They will attempt to match people with similar travel plans, and help them to make suitable arrangements.

Other driving distances to Gaylord: 210 miles from Ann Arbor (all 70 mph freeway), 345 miles from Chicago, 480 miles from Champaign-Urbana, Illinois, 60 miles from Mackinaw City, MI and the Macinac Bridge.

Accommodations

Ten rooms have been reserved from each of the following Gaylord motels at reasonable rates. When calling to make reservations, please refer to the blocks of rooms reserved in the name of the "Herald Times" (or Jim Grisso). Click here for a map showing the locations of these motels. 

Other rooms (B&B's, resorts, cottages, as well as motels) are listed in the following websites: hotels;motels; B&B's; cottages and resorts; hotel/motel rates and reservations; fairly comprehensive list -- except for B&B's.

Restaurants are listed in the following websites: Northern Michigan guide and Gaylord guide.

Other Gaylord links: link 1, link 2.

Elsewhere in Northern Michigan

There is much attractive country and shoreline around the north and west coasts of the lower Michigan peninsula. Traverse City, Petoskey, Charlevoix, Frankfort and Macinac Island all have nice lakeside accommodations, including some resorts. The Leelanau Peninsula is especially nice. Some websites: Northern Michigan Attractions; Traverse City area.


To Learn About Claude Shannon

Try the following websites.

Please let us know of other relevant websites, by email.


Organizing Committee of the IEEE Information Theory Society