David Blaauw

Professor

David Blaauw

Professor

David Blaauw

Professor

University of Michigan
EECS Department
Electrical & Computer Engineering
1301 Beal Ave., 2417C EECS
Ann Arbor, MI 48109
Tel: 734 763 4526
Fax: 734 763-4617
Email:

Subthreshold Leakage Reduction in Standby Mode

Students:

Primary Contact

Dongwoo Lee <dongwool@eecs.umich.edu>

We propose a new method that uses a combined approach of sleep-state assignment and threshold voltage (Vt) assignment in a dual-Vt process. While each of these methods has previously been used individually, their combined effect has not been leveraged to date. By combining Vt and sleep-state assignment, leakage current can be dramatically reduced since the circuit is in a known state in standby-mode and only transistors that are off need to be considered for high-Vt assignment. A significant improvement in the leakage/performance trade-off is therefore achievable using such a combined method. We formulate the optimization problem for simultaneous state and Vt assignment under delay constraints and propose both an exact method for its optimal solution as well as a number of practical heuristics with reasonable run time. We compare our results with Vt and sleep state assignment only and demonstrate an average decrease in leakage current of 5X compared to previous approaches.

Publications:

Static Leakage Reduction through Simultaneous Threshold Voltage and State Assignment

Dongwoo Lee, David Blaauw, "Static Leakage Reduction through Simultaneous Threshold Voltage and State Assignment," ACM/IEEE Design Automation Conference (DAC), June 2003, pg. 191-194 ©IEEE

File:

Presentations:

Standby Leakage Analysis and Optimization Methods for VLSI Design
"Standby Leakage Analysis and Optimization Methods for VLSI Design," full day tutorial with co-presenters Anirudh Devgan, Siva Narendra, Farid Najm, ACM/IEEE International Conference on Computer Aided Design (ICCAD), November 2003

 

Leakage Analysis and Reduction Methods
"Leakage Analysis and Reduction Methods," IBM Austin Research Laboratory, Austin, Texas, February 2003